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Black & Veatch selected to improve Ohio wastewater treatment plant

Published 01 February 2017

The Medina County Sanitary Engineers in Ohio have selected Black & Veatch to improve operational efficiency and energy savings for the Liverpool Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP).

The project is expected to save about $1.5m per year in plant operating expenditures, enabling the Medina utility to complete it without increasing customer rates.

Undre the project, the plant’s existing biosolids treatment process will be replaced with a technologically advanced system to increase performance.

A combination of renewable biogas and natural gas will be used to power the facility's operation. The project will benefit wastewater ratepayers via operational savings while lowering the plant’s carbon footprint.  

Located 30 miles south of Cleveland, the plant and serves about 35,000 customers by processing 9 million gallons of wastewater daily.

The project is scheduled to begin early this year and is expected to be completed in the spring of 2019.

Black & Veatch will be responsible for training the employees at the treatment plant on the most effective plant operation and maintenance procedures after the new systems are installed.

Medina County Sanitary engineer Amy S. Lyon-Galvin said: “Black & Veatch's team has been great to work with.

“Their process experts have been readily available, open to many questions, and deeply engaged in understanding our operations and wastewater treatment plant."

Black & Veatch water business performance contracting leader Pete Thomson said: “Black & Veatch will leverage its technological and design-build expertise in delivering this important project for Medina County.

“This effort will significantly improve both the treatment effectiveness and the plant’s sustainability.”